There is nothing wrong having a mental health probelm

I have asked friends how I can increase my numbers on my blog, and also on my facebook and one of my friends answered very honestly, that if they shared people would think they have a weakness.

This friend is great and I know if she read this, I would hope she understood that while I understood her choice and accept it, I don’t quite understand it. But also I have been told a few times that I am very open with it.

It has taken me to be housebound to admit it to my family, I have not been brave about it, I have often admitted it because I have no choice, but also I have no choice in what is going on in my brain than someone cutting off my foot

And I find it sad that this way of thinking still exists. It has taken me a while but I am happy with myself as a person, yes I have faults, and alright my weight and fitness could be better but I am working on this.

However surely having a mental health problem should be, in this day and age, seen as the same as a physicaly disability and not something we should shy away from.

I wish I knew the answer, but if you have a mental health problem, you are not alone and it is not a weakness

This entry was posted in Mental Health and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

12 Responses to There is nothing wrong having a mental health probelm

  1. rosieeek says:

    I think you are doing a great thing by sharing your story and being open and honest about mental health issues, you never know who you’re helping. My friends don’t share a lot of the posts I write either – in general, a lot of people are afraid of exposing themselves and being that honest on social media. It’s amazing if you are brave enough to do so.

    -Rosie
    http://www.hookupcultures.com

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Linda Lee says:

    I have been battling society’s stigma against mental illness since 1967, when I was 14 and diagnosed with schizophrenia. Numerous doctors have told me over the years that I have severe PTSD, not schizophrenia, but regardless of my diagnosis, family should still love you anyway, right? I mean it’s not like I have ever broken any laws! But I have been shunned by most of my family of origin for the past 48 years because of my post traumatic “mental breakdown” that happened when I was a teenager. I am a great-grandmother now, but that doesn’t matter. It also doesn’t matter that I went to nursing school and was elected class president and graduated at the top of the class. It also doesn’t matter that I wrote and published a novel 15 years ago. It also doesn’t matter that I raised three children. It doesn’t even matter that I was on the Oprah Show once, as an “inspiration.” All that matters to my image-conscious family is that I am “crazy.”

    Years ago when my siblings discovered Fakebook, I mean Facebook, I sent them friend requests and was thrilled to have the chance for us all to get to know each other as adults. Then one day I signed onto my newsfeed and found a public conversation between several of my relatives about how “weird” I am. I was shattered. I posted a comment that did not say anything abusive in return, I simply pointed out that their conversation about me was in my newsreel and it HURT. Not one of them apologized or even replied to me directly, they just commented to each other about how they were all new to FB and didn’t know that anyone else could see what they thought was a private conversation. SO, I don’t do FB now.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Linda Lee says:

      By the way, I am the eldest firstborn child in my family by many years. When I was forced out of my childhood home by my abusive mother at the age of 14, my siblings were ages 7 and under. I have not even lived in the same state since 1974. My family of origin doesn’t even know me. But they “know” I am crazy. Grrr.

      Also, I meant to tell you, the title of this post is missing a word. Which is a very normal, human thing to do. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Wow, you have been through it, this is why I am glad I have been born when I have been, just when the stigma of mental health is being broken through not when you were shunned for it.

      Because we have a history of it in our family I have been extremely lucky, but like yourself I have known people who have been shunned, personally I am not sure if I would have been strong enough

      Liked by 1 person

  3. honestme363 says:

    I don’t quite understand it either. I think you are right, it isn’t something we should be shying away from or hiding or acting like it doesn’t exist. I applaud you for sharing your story. It takes guts and courage. And it does help to know that you are not alone, and that it is not a weakness. Well said.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Don’t focus on your stats so much. Share your message honestly and continue reading and commenting on other blogs. Your exposure will grow and your stats will grow too. It’s not about the amount followers as it is about reaching the right followers.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I do agree, but I also like looking at the stats, although I did read somewhere, not sure where but that at some point you do need to step away from the stats, because they could consume you, so I tend to dip in and out and sometimes am really focused (obsessed) and then other days am not really fussed

      Liked by 1 person

  5. FreeBryd says:

    There’s such a stigma for admitting you have a mental health “problem”. So many are afraid to speak out, and this is sad! Good for you for bringing awareness to this issue. I’m sure even if not many respond, they will still find this info helpful. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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